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EMEA Trade Report

7/16/2018
 

Europe

 
May unveils UK soft Brexit blueprint
“The U.K. says the new relationship ‘could take the form of an Association Agreement’ with the EU. That means stronger ties than a traditional free-trade arrangement, such as the EU’s with Canada, and would be similar to the type of status Ukraine has. But the EU has previously ruled this out, saying it’s not on offer because of the U.K.’s own red lines: leaving the single market and customs union, and taking control over immigration and lawmaking.”

[Bloomberg]
 
Switzerland files WTO case against Trump tariffs
“The Swiss government has requested consultations through the WTO – the first step in initiating a dispute settlement proceeding. China, India, Canada, Mexico, Norway, Russia and the European Union have already done so. Several of these countries have also imposed retaliatory tariffs of their own.”

[Independent]
 
 

Middle East

 
Cargo vessels de-listed from ship registries for transporting grain from Crimea to Syria
“Ukraine says shipments from Crimea violate Western sanctions and has complained to the United Nations’ London-based shipping agency the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and asked member states to de-list any vessels involved.”

[Reuters]
 
Turkey could benefit from U.S.-China trade war
A business official said Turkey could launch “Turkish organized industries in the U.S. for being able to produce goods there and offer it to the ‘huge’ American market right away.”

[Hurriyet Daily News]
 
Kuwait and China sign agreements
Among the agreements is a three-year memorandum of understanding on e-commerce that “aims to boost cooperation in facilitating trade between the two countries and achieve sustainable development in the field.”

[Kuwait Times]
 
 

Africa

 
Ethiopia says re-opening roads to Eritrea's Red Sea ports a priority
“In a move that ended a 20-year military stand-off, the Horn of African neighbours agreed on Monday to open embassies, develop ports and resume flights. The historic reconciliation could transform politics and security in the volatile Horn region, which lies along one of the world’s busiest shipping routes.”

[Reuters]